Evaluación Formativa mediante E-rúbricas

Educación 4.0

Desde la web “e-learning, conocimiento en red y web colectiva” nos llega este monográfico sobre la evaluación a través de rúbricas. Este post redactado por Juan José Calderón Amador es sin duda alguna muy interesante en su lectura ya que te permite introducirte en el mundo de las rúbricas o mejorar el sistema si ya lo aplicas. Aquí os lo dejo:

Tabla de contenidos

Editorial

E-rubrics to facilitate self-regulated learning PDF
Karl Steffens 11-12

Monográfico / Tema del mes

PRESENTACIÓN: Evaluación formativa con e-rúbrica: aproximación al estado del arte PDF
Manuel Cebrián de la Serna, María Elena Bergman 15-22
PRESENTATION: Formative Assessment with eRubrics: an Approach to the State of the Art PDF
Manuel Cebrián de la Serna, María Elena Bergman 23-29
Rúbricas y autorregulación: pautas para promover una cultura de la autonomía en la formación profesional PDF
Gabriela de la Cruz…

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“What kind of world are we trying to represent?”

Sam Shepherd

I was at the regional NATECLA YH day conference this week, and the final plenary was from Heather Buchanan of Leeds Beckett University talking about the uses and abuses of global coursebooks.

It was an interesting and indeed controversial topic, particularly to a group of people who probably rarely follow a single coursebooks, preferring out of necessity or expectation, to pick and choose published work, or develop our own materials. I’m not going to weigh in on the coursebook/no coursebook argument, although I do challenge those ESOL managers who think we should have a full year scheme of work at the start of the academic year to tell me why we shouldn’t just follow a fixed coursebook which we adapt to the class.

No, the thing which really resonated from Heather’s talk was the comment at the title of this post: “What kind of world are we trying to represent?”

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Recent Books: on Adolescence, Technology, Sexuality, and More

John Palfrey

A few times per year, I have been sharing a “Head of School’s bookshelf” with community members at Phillips Academy.  It comes this time in two parts: 1) six books that are among those I’ve read in the past few months and which I commend as “community reads” because of one or more connections to the work that we have underway at PA; and 2) a special list of readings about sexual education. I express my particular thanks to the members of the PA Sex Ed Working Group, who compiled the Part II listing below at my request.  I hope you might go to your local independent bookstore or library to pick up a copy of ones that are of interest!

Part I: Adolescence, Education, Technology, and the Brain

danah boyd, It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens (Yale, 2014)

Note: This book has been years in the making…

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Ever feel alone in a crowded place? This artist gets you

ideas.ted.com

Adam Magyar struggles with the speed of time. (Who can blame him?) In response, the Hungarian artist and photographer captures densely populated urban areas at extremely high speeds — then slows each moment down so you can experience every breath and blink. The result: hypnotic videos that reveal the hidden depths of everyday experiences. One conceptual series, Stainless, turns a mundane subway commute into a meditation on mortality and human perception. In Stainless, Magyar creates both videos and still photographs, the latter using a line-scan camera (the same kind of camera used in a scanner) to turn a speeding train into “a frozen image of impossible clarity and stillness, a reality imperceptible to both passengers speeding into the station and bystanders waiting to board,” writes Joshua Hammer in Matter. “The individuals in his trains ride together yet apart, lost in their own thoughts, often transfixed by their hand-held devices.”

Below, see five haunting gifs…

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